Recent Rumberlings

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Again I must apologise for a lack of posts although there has been a lot occurring in the past few weeks. Sadly life as an Open University student (something I will be writing on shortly), working full-time and having a rather active 7-year-old means my little old website tends to get forgotten about. But enough of my belly aching here of some of the world-wide volcanic updates for the month of May.

Shindake 

Friday at 9.59 am local time Mount Shindake on the island of Kuchinoerabu erupted with little warning. The plume scaled over 9 km high and a pyroclastic flow reached as far as the shore. The alert level was rasied to 5 and all 141 people on the island have been evacuated to neighbouring Yakushima island or the mainland and no one has been reported to have been hurt. It is thought that further explosions or more pyroclastic flows are likely as this volcano rarely produces one-off events. When Shindake erupted on August 3rd last year activity lasted for several days.

Telica

Sods law, I was in Nicaragua only a few months ago and all was relatively quiet. Now both Telica, north of the city of Leon and Concepción on the island of Ometepe have seen small eruptions in the past few weeks. Telica, the more active of the two, hit headlines on May 11th when a group of hikers filmed a small eruption at the summit. The night before a loud explosion was heard but not ash could be seen and it was still deemed safe for people to climb its flanks the next day. I will be honest the video which emerged did annoy me slightly as it is very indicative of todays society; of course when some thing explodes one does not think of their own safety, oh no we get our cameras out and film!

It produced about 50 small explosions within the next week or so before several days of apparent calm. It came back to life again on May 27th with a slightly larger eruption which created an ash column just over 3 km high. It is not thought that these explosions are an indication of movement of magma, rather phreatic eruptions.

Concepción on the other hand experienced about 60 small explosions on May 8th and several small earthquakes nearby. No ash was record although high gas emissions were recorded. By May 24th there had been 947 small explosions near the summit.

Wolf

Isle Isabella, the Galápagos’ largest island, is also home to its most active volcanoes. Last week Volcan Wolf began erupting with lava flows on its south eatern flank and producing an eruption column almost 15 km high according to the Washington VAAC. Satellite monitoring indicates that to plume is sulphur dioxide rich with little ash, with up to 200 kt of sulphur dioxide being emitted during the first 13hrs of the eruption alone.  Media coverage of the eruption has been higher than usual seeing as little threat is posed to the human residants, however the Galapagos islands are rich in wild life found no were else on Earth are being threatened by the situation. 

Piton de la Fournaise

A eruption began on May 17th and continued through to May 26th at Piton de la Fournaise, Reunion Island’s most active volcano. Activity and output has decreased on a whole however shows little sign of ending. 

Calbuco

The alert remains at orange for Calbuco although activity is lower than in recent weeks. Incandescence has still be osbsvered at the crater up until the night of the 26th and small gas and ash plumes tend to be about 300 m abover the summit. 6,685 people are still displaced by the 20 km exclusion zone which remains in place.
Figure 1; Shindake http://beforeitsnews.com/environment/2015/05/mount-shindake-volcano-eruption-2015-japan-issues-highest-alert-2529958.html

Figure 2; Telica http://www.stuff.co.nz/world/68521780/nicaraguas-telica-volcano-roars-to-life-spewing-ash-gas

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