Eruption Update; Bardabunga, Mayon, Kilaeua and more

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Bárðarbunga

Yes the might fissure is still going strong in the Holuhran lava field. It is now being coined as one of the largest effusive eruptions Iceland has seen in the past 150 years. In terms of lava production it is only second to Hekla’s 1947-48 13month long eruption, however this title could be taken in as little as two weeks if output continues at the rate it is now. Seismicity has decreased since August but we are still seeing low levels along the dyke and stronger quakes under Bárðarbunga particularly around the caldera rim. The Scientific Advisory Board of the Icelandic Civil Protection is still suggesting the following three scenarios are considered most likely: 

  • The eruption on Holuhraun declines gradually and subsidence of the Bardarbunga caldera stops. 

  • Large-scale subsidence of the caldera occurs, prolonging or strengthening the eruption on Holuhraun. In this situation, it is likely that the eruptive fissure would lengthen southwards under Dyngjujokull, resulting in a jokulhlaup and an ash-producing eruption. It is also possible that eruptive fissures could develop in another location under the glacier.

  • Large-scale subsidence of the caldera occurs, causing an eruption at the edge of the caldera. Such an eruption would melt large quantities of ice, leading to a major jokulhlaup, accompanied by ash fall.

SiO2 emissions are still one of the most pressing concerns for the Icelandic people. Pollution warnings are constant, and the met office has consistently tracked the SiO2 cloud which changes course with change in weather.

1. Map of current SiO2 cloud coming from the fissure site.

1. Map of current SiO2 cloud coming from the fissure site.

 

Mayon

All evidence still indicates to a potentially major eruption could occur in the next few weeks. Phivolcs has said that there has been at least five rock fall events in the past 24 hours and one volcanic tremor. Ground deformation continues with at least 3 mm of inflation recorded in the past 10 days. At times of good visibility white steam plumes are seen drifting northwest from the summit and monitors are recording SiO2 emissions at an average of  308 tonnes a day. The 6-km radius Permanent Danger Zone (PDZ) around the volcano is still in place as well as the 7-km Extended Danger Zone (EDZ) on the southeastern flank due to the danger of rock falls, landslides and sudden explosions or dome collapse that may generate hazardous volcanic flows.

For day to day bulletins visit Phivolcs; http://www.phivolcs.dost.gov.ph/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&id=70&Itemid=500008

 

Kilauea

The June 27th lava flow is still advancing albeit slowly. The HVO has said it has continued approximately 350 yards since Wednesday and is currently is 1.2 miles upslope from Apaa St. and 1.9 mils from Pahoa Village Road. Although there is no immediate threat to power lines or our facilities, Hawaii Electric light are closely following the flow and have even began installing heat resistant and dispersive materials around utility poles in the Puna area.

2. Working to protect utilities but wrapping poles in protective materials.

2. Working to protect utilities but wrapping poles in protective materials.

 

Now these are just eruptions I have so far spoken about on this page, but where else is hearing volcanic rumblings…..

Sheveluch

KVERT has reported in the past few weeks, Sheveluch in the Central Kamchatka region, has had ash explosions, incandescence, hot avalanches, as well as fumarolic activity. An ash plumes that rose 11-11.5 km (36,000-37,700 ft) after an explosion on September 24th still lingers. An ash cloud 250 by 207 km drifted NNE and the aviation code remains at orange.

 

Copahue

Sat on the Chile – Argentine boarder, Copahue experienced an intense seismic swarm on September 26th with over 140 long period events being recorded. Web cams show increased emissions; mostly white plumes, with some ash rising 200-500 m drifting SE. The aviation code remains at yellow.

Aira

JMA reported 12 explosions in the last few days of September in Aira Caldera’s Sakurajima volcano ejecting tephra as far as 1,300 m. An explosion on the 28th sent a dense ash plume 3 km in to the air. The alert level remains at 3.

 

Popocatepetl

Continuing emissions of water vapor, gas, and occasional small amounts of ash have occurred from the summit. Incandescence from the crater was observed at night. The Alert Level remained at to Yellow, Phase Two.

 

Santa Maria

On September heavy rainfall triggered a hot lahar that descended the Cabello de Ángel River, a tributary of the Nimá I river drainage on the S flank of Santa María’s Santiaguito lava-dome complex. The lahar carried tree trunks and branches, had a strong sulfur odor, and was 18 m wide and 2 m deep. During 27-28 and 29-30 September lava flows travelled down the S flank and steam plumes rose 400-500 m and drifted 600-800 m SW.

 

These just a small selection of volcanoes world wide which are showing signs of activity. As well as the 8 listed here the Smithonian Institution Global Volcanism Program lists a further 9 which show increased levels of activity thus showing how active the Earth is.

3. GVP map of volcanic activity.

3. GVP map of volcanic activity.

 

 

1. SiO2 Map; http://www.vedur.is/vedur/spar/gasdreifing Accessed 04/10/14

2. Protecting Puna; http://khon2.com/2014/10/03/hawaii-electric-lights-contingency-plans-as-kilauea-lava-approaches/ Accessed 05/10/14

3. GVP Map; http://www.volcano.si.edu/reports_weekly.cfm#vn_300270 Accessed 05/10/14

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